Keep Your Unborn Child Healthy via Good Oral Hygiene

Tips from Dr. Jeff Golub-Evans, NYC celeb cosmetic dentist, on how to keep your unborn child healthy with good oral hygiene.

For Your Health

Dental Tips for Moms-to-Be

Keeping your mouth in tip-top shape while you’re pregnant

-Stephanie Elliot

woman at dentist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I was pregnant, I never gave much consideration to my mouth, unless I was thinking about what I could shove in it next! But oral hygiene is a definite must for preggos, and these tips come straight from Dr. Jeff Golub-Evans, NYC celebrity cosmetic dentist, who recommends practicing good oral hygiene and eating a healthy diet.

DO:

1. See a dentist during each trimester for a cleaning and checkup. The character of saliva changes during pregnancy, becoming thicker and ropier, which makes you more susceptible to cavities.

2. Make sure you are comfortable during the dental procedure and examination, and if you need a pillow, just ask. Stay relaxed, listen to music, keep your legs uncrossed and remember to breathe!

3. Rather than one long appointment, schedule short and frequent oral exams.

4. Use as little local anesthesia as possible, and always request the nonadrenaline form. Adrenaline can cross the placenta.

5. Brush and floss regularly to avoid any unwanted plaque buildup and pregnancy gingivitis.

6. If toothpaste makes you nauseated, use one that is bland-tasting; ask your dental professional for recommendations.

7. If you experience morning sickness, make sure to rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash frequently.

     DON’T:

1. Don’t allow gum disease or any oral discomforts to go unnoticed. Increased hormones may cause the tissue in the mouth to swell and bleed. Premature births have been associated with periodontal disease.

2. Don’t use any narcotics for pain.

3. Don’t take X-rays unless necessary. If one is needed, make sure that a lead vest is placed atop your abdomen.

4. Don’t eat sugary foods. Eat a well-balanced meal with calcium, protein, phosphorous and vitamins A, C and D. Your child’s teeth begin to develop between the third and sixth month of pregnancy, so what you eat affects his or her health.


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